New Life Family Church
Wednesday July 28, 2021 WED
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  • I Am Blessed
  • July 28, 2021 The Commands of Christ - 12
    Adult Bible Study
    We are talking about the counterintuitive route to TRUE happiness as we discuss The Beatitudes.
    We do this as we continue on systematic study of the Commandments of Christ. A study commanded by Jesus.
    Recap:
    We continue to cover the commands by looking at those that relate to Christ as Lord of our life. Jesus is Lord as we:
    Deny Yourself | Take Up My Yoke and Learn from Me | Follow Me | You Have Heard It Said . . . but I Say to You | Pray This Way | Do This in Remembrance of Me | (Apply ourselves to) Remember What I Said
    The commands of Jesus, where He said, “You have heard it said(been taught by the Rabbis, Pharisees, Scribes) … but what they teach is the letter of the law that falls short — my commands EXCEED the letter of the Law to the Spirit of the Law.”
    Jesus gives us commands that are impossible to obey apart from the anointing of the Holy Spirit.
    In fact:
    The Beatitudes initially seem to be merely soothing and beautiful precepts for overly spiritual and seemingly useless people, but of very little practical use in the rigid, fast-paced workdays of the world in which we live. We soon find, however, that the Beatitudes contain the “dynamite” of the Holy Spirit. And they “explode” when the circumstances of our lives cause them to do so. ⠀
    The Sermon on the Mount is full of examples where Jesus said: “You have heard it said … but I say to you.” You’ve heard what other people tell you do, how to live — but this is what I command you...
    Dig:
    Read: Matthew 5:1-12
    Matthew 5:1–12 NASB 2020
    1 Now when Jesus saw the crowds, He went up on the mountain; and after He sat down, His disciples came to Him. 2 And He opened His mouth and began to teach them, saying, 3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 4 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. 5 “Blessed are the gentle, for they will inherit the earth. 6 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be satisfied. 7 “Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy. 8 “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God. 9 “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called sons of God. 10 “Blessed are those who have been persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when people insult you and persecute you, and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of Me. 12 Rejoice and be glad, for your reward in heaven is great; for in this same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.
    So, we start a study of the Sermon on the Mount with the beatitudes.
    No, Jesus didn’t say, “I command you to… BUT, don’t these statements have the force of commands since they include blessing?:
    Be poor in spirit
    To mourn
    To be gentle
    To hunger and thirst for righteousness
    To be merciful
    To be pure in heart
    To be a peacemaker
    To GLADLY suffer persecution for the sake of righteousness. Even more, to REJOICE when we suffer for Jesus.
    Last week we talked about pleasing God. Do you believe living according to these beatitudes pleases God?
    Why?
    How do you think the world receives these beatitudes?
    1. How does our normal description of the blessed or fortunate person compare with those whom Jesus considers blessed (Matthew 5:1-12)?
    The Greek word makarios can and does mean "happy." So J. B. Phillips translates the opening words of each beatitude, "How happy are. . . !" And several commentators have explained them as Jesus' prescription for human happiness. Nevertheless, it is seriously misleading to render makarios "happy." For happiness is a subjective state, whereas Jesus is making an objective judgment about these people. He is declaring not what they may feel like ("happy"), but what God thinks of them and what on that account they are—("blessed").
    2.To be "poor in spirit" (Matthew 5:3) is to acknowledge our spiritual poverty, our bankruptcy before God. Why is this an indispensable condition for receiving the Kingdom of heaven?
    The poverty and hunger to which Jesus refers in the beatitudes are spiritual states. It is true that the Aramaic word Jesus used may have been simply "poor," as in Luke's version. But then "the poor," God's poor, were already a clearly defined group in the Old Testament, and Matthew will have been correct to translate "poor in spirit." For "the poor" were not so much the poverty stricken as the pious who—partly because they were needy, downtrodden, oppressed or in other ways afflicted—had put their faith and hope in God.
    Why is it so difficult for us to admit our spiritual poverty?
    It seems like a weakness and we don’t admit to weaknesses.
    4. Why would those who are poor in spirit feel a need to mourn (Matthew 5:4)?
    Question 4. One might almost translate this second beatitude "Happy are the unhappy" in order to draw attention to the startling paradox it contains. It is plain from the context that those here promised comfort are not primarily those who mourn the loss of a loved one, but those who mourn the loss of their innocence, their righteousness, their self-respect. It is not the sorrow of bereavement to which Christ refers, but the sorrow of repentance.
    5. Those who mourn feel sorrow not only for their own sin but also for the sin they see around them. What have you heard in the news lately that causes you to mourn?
    Too many things! The assault on the children (their sexuality).
    6. How do you think those who mourn will be comforted (Matthew 5:4)?
    Question 6. Such mourners, who bewail their own sinfulness, will be comforted by the only comfort which can relieve their distress, namely the free forgiveness of God. According to the Old Testament, Messiah was to be "the Comforter" who would "bind up the brokenhearted" (Isaiah 61:1-3). And Christ does pour oil into our wounds and speak peace to our sore, scarred consciences. Yet we still mourn over the havoc of suffering and death which sin spreads throughout the world. For only in the final state of glory will Christ's comfort be complete; for only then will sin be no more, and "God will wipe away every tear from their eyes" (Rev. 7:17).
    Isaiah 61:1–3 NASB 2020
    1 The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, Because the Lord anointed me To bring good news to the humble; He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, To proclaim release to captives And freedom to prisoners; 2 To proclaim the favorable year of the Lord And the day of vengeance of our God; To comfort all who mourn, 3 To grant those who mourn in Zion, Giving them a garland instead of ashes, The oil of gladness instead of mourning, The cloak of praise instead of a disheartened spirit. So they will be called oaks of righteousness, The planting of the Lord, that He may be glorified.
    Revelation 21:1–4 NASB 2020
    1 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea. 2 And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. 3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne, saying, “Behold, the tabernacle of God is among the people, and He will dwell among them, and they shall be His people, and God Himself will be among them, 4 and He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away.”
    7. How would a true estimate of ourselves (Matthew 5:3-4) lead us to be "meek"—to have a humble and gentle attitude to others (Matthew 5:5)?
    Question 7. We tend to think of "the meek" as weak and effeminate. Yet the Greek adjective means "gentle," "humble," "considerate" and "courteous." Dr. Lloyd-Jones sums it up admirably: "Meekness is essentially a true view of oneself, expressing itself in attitude and conduct with respect to others. . . . The man who is truly meek is the one who is truly amazed that God and man can think of him as well as they do and treat him as well as they do" (Studies in the Sermon on the Mount [Leicester, England: Inter-Varsity Press, 1977], pp. 68-69).
    8. From the world's point of view, why is it surprising that the meek will inherit the earth?
    Only the powerful, the ruthless, the rich will inherit the earth.
    9. What has Jesus said so far that might lead us to hunger and thirst for righteousness (Matthew 5:6)?
    Because we realize that is the only thing that allows us to inherit anything.
    Righteousness - right standing with God
    10. Biblical righteousness has three aspects: legal, moral and social. What does it mean to hunger and thirst for each of these?
    Question 10. Legal righteousness is justification, a right relationship with God. Moral righteousness is that righteousness of character and conduct which pleases God. Social righteousness, as we learn from the Law and the Prophets, is concerned with seeking humanity's liberation from oppression, together with the promotion of civil rights, justice in the law courts, integrity in business dealings, and honor in home and family affairs.
    11. Jesus promises that those who hunger and thirst for righteousness will be filled (Matthew 5:6). What can you do cultivate a healthy, hearty spiritual appetite?
    Make it a priority. Seek first the Kingdom of God (Matthew 6:33)
    12. Ask God to satisfy some of your hunger and thirst as you study the Sermon on the Mount.
    Let’s pray to that end.
    Adapted from: LifeGuide Topical Bible Studies - Sermon on the Mount.
      • Matthew 5:1–12NLT

      • Download

        Worship Practice

        July 1, 2020 - 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM
      • Download

        Worship Team Practice

        September 2, 2020 - 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
        Wednesday 7:30 pm

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