St. Luke's Church Faribault
4-14-19
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        Easter Breakfast

        April 13, 2019 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
        Easter Sunday
  • Hosanna Loud Hosanna
  • In The Name Of The Lord
  • All Glory, Laud, and Honor
  • Good Morning. Today is Palm Sunday, the start of passover week for the Jewish people, and the start of Holy Week for Christians. These last few weeks of Lent we have been looking at the passion of Jesus as recorded in the gospel of St. Luke. We started with the betrayal of Jesus by Judas, and we looked at how throughout the passion, Luke wants us know that there is a spiritual battle being fought. Yet, even in the middle of that hour when it appears darkness was reigning, it is all according to God’s plan.
    Next we looked at the trials of Jesus before the Sanhedrin, Pilate, and Herod. While in the betrayal the forces of darkness reigned, Luke made the point that now the forces and powers of the world seemed to be reigning over Jesus as he just completely submitted to them.
    The text, next in Luke takes us to the cross. When we look at this text it is sacred and somber. It is sad, and it causes us to think, and sometimes to weep. And rightly so. After all the King of the universe, the one who no sin, is being numbered among the transgressors, and is horribly mistreated. But as we step forward, let’s remember that our story does not end in defeat.
    Let us pray.
    Pray
    Luke 23:26–43 NIV
    26 As the soldiers led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus. 27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then “ ‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!” and to the hills, “Cover us!” ’ 31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?” 32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed. 33 When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left. 34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots. 35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.” 36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.” 38 There was a written notice above him, which read: this is the king of the jews. 39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us!” 40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.” 42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.”
    Last week we left off at verse 25.
    Luke 23:25–26 NIV
    25 He released the man who had been thrown into prison for insurrection and murder, the one they asked for, and surrendered Jesus to their will. 26 As the soldiers led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus.
    The Way to the Cross
    According to various ancient Roman sources, it was common for the accused to carry the cross beam to the place of execution. There seems to be some discussion on whether Jesus carried the whole cross or the simply the cross beam. This detail is in some ways inconsequential, in any event, Jesus is forced to carry his instrument of torture through the streets of Jerusalem to Golgotha. He is weak, losing blood, most likely in shock, and this is a struggle. So, the Roman soldiers decide to enlist a bystander, and our attention is drawn to this fellow Simon of Cyrene.
    Simon is from Cyrene in North Africa. He is on his way into town presumably to celebrate the passover when the Romans grab Him and force Him into carrying the cross for this Jesus fellow. There is no indication that he knows Jesus or has any other connection. He appears in Matthew and Mark as well. In all three accounts, it does appear that he helps willingly. He is pressed into service, forced into service, seized here in Luke’s Gospel. The authorities have somehow “forced” him into doing this.
    The next people who encounter Jesus are a group of weeping women.
    Luke 23:27 NIV
    27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him.
    These ladies are mourning and wailing as Jesus passes. In Mideast culture during times of mourning, people express themselves much more vocally them we do. They do this at funerals. These ladies might show up regularly for the death marches and the are crying and screaming, maybe even throwing themselves on the ground, as Jesus comes upon them.
    Luke 23:28 NIV
    28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children.
    In some fashion Jesus turns to address them directly. This is interesting isn’t it? He turns and addresses them during this very important event. I mean think about it even though he is in incredible pain, He can barely go on, He is on his way to his torture, He is feeling the wrath of God for sins on Him, and these women are wailing and mourning, and it draws His attention. His attention enough that He turns to them. It is almost unthinkable, but he stops and makes this a teaching moment.And He says stop weeping for me.
    Isn’t that a bit odd. Don’t weep for me. This is sad isn’t it? An innocent man. We love Jesus, we hate to see him like this. This is terrible. Instead Jesus says, weep for yourselves, and your children. Weep for yourselves? Your children? They do not have it half as bad as Jesus does, the flogging, the cross, this is awful. Why would Jesus say such as thing?
    Then Jesus says something that for us is hard to understand, but for these 1st century women it would have been clear.
    Luke 23:29–31 NIV
    29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then “ ‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!” and to the hills, “Cover us!” ’ 31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?”
    To these women, it would have obvious. Jesus is saying is that there is a coming judgement. God the righteous judge will judge Israel, and in those days it will terrible. This is a prophecy out of Hosea chapter 1 verse 8, it is repeated in a number of places, including the book of Revelation verse 6:16, and Isaiah 2:19.
    In other words, someday God is going to judge all of mankind for their sins, everyone that includes you and me. Don’t weep for Jesus, don’t be sad for Jesus. Jesus is doing what He wants to do, to make all things new. He has his business to do. Is it sad, and painful, and awful, yes. but don’t be sad about it.
    What is really sad is that we all have sin. What is the real tragedy is that there is a judgement coming, and we should be sad, and we should weep and wail and carry on for our sin. Our sin is what causes us not to live in the favor of God but instead causes us to live under God’s curse.
    For the jews a woman with children was a blessing, now Jesus says, blessed are the childless women. The hills and mountains, is where people met with God, now they should fall on them and cover them. Sin has caused this green vine of Israel tp be fruitful but one day it will be dry like a dead vine.
    Luke seems to be telling the reader, that the way to the cross means looking at sin with sadness, and not at Jesus with sadness. The way to the cross means preparing for real repentance and that means mourning not the consequences of the sin, but mourning the sin itself.
    Next,
    The Identity.
    Luke, in this next section wants us to be sure of who Jesus really is. During the previous section, the trial Jesus did not really appear to be much of a Messiah. He did not show any authority at all. The question is who is he?
    Luke 23:32 NIV
    32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed.
    Jesus is among the criminals. Normally, this is not a place for a Messiah or a King. He is among criminals. The prophet Isaiah talked about this about, 750 years before.
    Isaiah 53:12 NIV
    12 Therefore I will give him a portion among the great, and he will divide the spoils with the strong, because he poured out his life unto death, and was numbered with the transgressors. For he bore the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.
    Numbered with the transgressors. He was led out with the criminals. We have the advantage of taking our time, and looking back through the scriptures but they didn’t, so they couldn’t see who Jesus is.
    Luke 23:33 NIV
    33 When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left.
    Oddly, Luke does not call attention to the crucifixion. Does not mention the nails, the process, or the pain. I think this goes along with the the weeping women. For Luke, it is not what is important. What is important, is that Jesus is crucified with the criminals. But Jesus does not act like a criminal.
    Luke 23:34 NIV
    34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.
    And Jesus prays, Father, forgive them, He addresses the Father. The person who is wronged does the forgiving. The wrongs done, are sins against the Father. That is the way it is with our sins, even when we sin against a person, ultimately that sin is against God.
    Here Jesus is the mediator, the one coming between the sinner and the Father as he prays even for this heinous sin. Perhaps, the most serious of all sins, and Jesus prays Forgive them Father for they know not what they do. They do not know, they are not realizing that they are taking Messiah, the God-man, the son of God, and nailing Him to a cross. He is praying for the people who appear by all intents and purposes to be His enemies. He is praying for His enemies.
    Jesus is fulfilling the command he gave us in Luke 6.
    Luke 6:27–28 NIV
    27 “But to you who are listening I say: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.
    And in Luke 23, it is.
    Luke 23:34 NIV
    34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.
    They divide his clothing by casting lots. This fulfills another scripture, Psalm 22:18.
    Psalm 22:18 NIV
    18 They divide my clothes among them and cast lots for my garment.
    Innocent--yet numbered among the transgressors---the soldiers are casting lots for His garments. Praying to His Father for his enemies… All things predicted in God’s word. The people should be seeing this, but...
    Luke 23:35 NIV
    35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.”
    The people stood watching. The people are indifferent. He is this sorry man, praying for enemies, odd. Look at this man over here..
    The rulers, they knew well what Jesus was claiming, and they do not like it. Wherever the gospel proclaimed there is opposition, so the rulers sneer at him. He saved others, If He really is God’s messiah the chosen one, Let Him save himself.
    The irony here is that if Jesus saves himself, he cannot save others. Jesus must not save himself in order to save others. He must be the substitution.
    If you are the Messiah.... this may sound familiar, it is what Satan said in the wilderness, in Luke 4, 3 and 4:9 If you are the son of God- Satan would say. He questions Jesus’s identity. That is what is going on here, time after time.
    Number with criminals, yet the word of God in Isaiah says different. The soldier’s take His clothing, yet the Psalms prophesied they would. Sneered at and taunted If you are the Messiah? Everything points to him being the Messiah. What is happening here?
    Luke 23:36–37 NIV
    36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”
    The soldiers came up and mock him. Jest and flippancy at Jesus. To rub salt in the wound, they offered him sour wine. Not a drink for a king, and said If you are the King-save yourself.
    Then God even makes it more obvious by having the sign put above his head.
    Luke 23:38 NIV
    38 There was a written notice above him, which read: this is the king of the jews.
    There was this sign-This IS the king of the Jews. Here it is Pilates final stamp of authority over the jews, yet at the same time prophetic. People wanted it to say He claimed to be king of the jews, but this says, This is the King of the jews.
    Luke has presented us with many characters in this section. There were the people, watching, indifferent to who He was or claiming to be. The rulers, exhibiting their authority sneering at Jesus The soldiers, were mocking, and flippant. All over His identity, But there is one.
    Two Sides
    Now, during the crucifixion, things are going to become crystal clear, there are really only two positions here, and Jesus is hanging between them.
    Luke 23:39 NIV
    39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us!”
    One side hurls insults, One does not know the identity. Are you the Messiah? Save yourself and us.
    One side wants out, or the predicament sin caused. Save us! He wants out. This is horrible. This is not a good way to die. If you are the Messiah save me-If you are the the Messiah-pull me out of my predicament. Jesus, if you are God, show me by taking me out of this mess I have caused myself.
    Luke 23:40 NIV
    40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence?
    There is the other side-Don’t you fear God?You are dying here-We are dying here-We are all dying here. Don’t you fear God? In a minute we are going to see God-DO you have no fear of God?
    Luke 23:41 NIV
    41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.”
    We are punished justly, but Jesus is innocent-We are getting what we deserve. But Jesus is innocent. God is a just judge. All will be punished justly. But Jesus has done nothing wrong. Don’t you fear God?
    Luke 23:42 NIV
    42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”
    And He prays. He prays a prayer right there on the cross. The thief prays in such a way that shows he is different from everyone else in that scene. This is how the thief prays
    The Thief.
    Admits Sin
    Knows Who Jesus is
    Has Faith in Jesus
    Calls on the name of the Lord
    Number 1. He admits he is a sinner. He knows he is guilty of sin. That is evident when he says -We are punished justly. He knows his sin is not just against man but is against God. That is evident when he says Don’t you fear God? It is what Jesus was talking about with the weeping women. He is sorry FOR HIS SIN, not the consequences of the sin. The other side the other thief is only sorry he is stuck on the cross. Jesus if you can do something get us outta here!
    Number 2. He knows who Jesus is. This man is innocent, he said. He knows Jesus has done nothing wrong. He knows Jesus is a king, Jesus remember me when you come into your kingdom. He is declaring that Jesus has a kingdom.
    Number 3. He has faith. At this point with Jesus hanging on the cross, He cannot see the kingdom of God. It looks really dark. There is the King hanging, bleeding, dying, but still this common criminal has faith that Jesus is coming into His kingdom.
    Number 4. He calls on the name of the Lord. Remember me Jesus. Remember me when you come into your kingdom. Everyone who call on the name of the Lord will be saved,
    And then Jesus says to Him,
    Luke 23:43 NIV
    43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.”
    The verse that gives people fits. The thief has not been baptized, has not had discipleship classes, he has not taken communion, he has not fed the poor or given to the church, he hasn’t done penance. It is just the word of Christ to him, with all of his ins and his faith in Jesus as the messiah. Just the power of the cross. It is on that cross thatJesus assures Him the Today, you will be with in paradise. The abode of God, with Jesus. That is the magnificent power of the gospel.
    Faith in Christ alone. You only need Jesus You can’t bring anything, and you can’t do anything. You can’t help Jesus out like Simon, and you can’t just feel sorry for Jesus like the women. You can’t be indifferent like the people watching, you cannot be religious like the rulers, and you certain can’t be flippant like soldiers.
    That is it the gospel. The only way to the Father is by faith in the the Lord Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, by His work on the cross.
    pause
    I get it. Why preach the cross on Palm Sunday. Why all these joyous songs then, we look at the flogging and the crown of thorns and the nails, and we say that is sad. We say to our selves our sin has put Jesus there, and we grieve because our sin put Jesus on the cross. And that is one way of looking at.
    But, the gospel is like a beautiful gem. You can turn it that way and it shines, and you can turn it another way and it shines all more brilliantly. Weep not that your sins somehow brought Jesus to cross, but Weep for your sin because your sin has severed your relationship with Jesus. Weep for your sin because you have broken fellowship with the God of the universe. Weep for your sin because you did not recognize that a relationship with Jesus is far better than the temporary benefits any sin can provide, and do not weep for Jesus, because behold through the cross He is restoring, repairing and bringing us into a relationship with God the Father. And as you weep for your sins, let Jesus change those tears into tears of joy because He loved you so much that he willingly laid down His life so that you could live.
    We started the service with triumphal entry passage. Often we look at the triumphal entry march into Jerusalem, and we contrast it with this death march to calvary. We say how people once cried Hosanna now cry Crucify Him. But the Gospel says that the victory march did not just end on Palm Sunday. The gospel says that the victory march continued up the hill to Calvary. The gospel says that by the crucifixion of the Messiah the sinless son of God, was a Victory over sin and death. The Gospel says that a way was made that you and I can come into this relationship with God our Father.
    We can look at the gospel in its beauty and realize that it was at Calvary where the victory was won. It was at the cross, and through the cross that there is now no condemnation for those in Christ Jesus. And we still we weep, but we weep tears of joy as we step from death into life through our faith in the finished work of Jesus.
    2 Corinthians 6:2 NIV
    2 For he says, “In the time of my favor I heard you, and in the day of salvation I helped you.” I tell you, now is the time of God’s favor, now is the day of salvation.
    Today is the day of salvation. Turn to Jesus and be saved!
      • Luke 23:26–43NIV2011

      • Luke 23:25–26NIV2011

      • Luke 23:27NIV2011

      • Luke 23:28NIV2011

      • Luke 23:29–31NIV2011

      • Luke 23:32NIV2011

      • Isaiah 53:12NIV2011

      • Luke 23:33NIV2011

      • Luke 23:34NIV2011

      • Luke 6:27–28NIV2011

      • Luke 23:34NIV2011

      • Psalm 22:18NIV2011

      • Luke 23:35NIV2011

      • Luke 23:36–37NIV2011

      • Luke 23:38NIV2011

      • Luke 23:39NIV2011

      • Luke 23:40NIV2011

      • Luke 23:41NIV2011

      • Luke 23:42NIV2011

      • Luke 23:43NIV2011

  • Lift High The Cross
  • We Will Glorify
  • Hosanna

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