• A sprawling resource that brings us into Jerusalem during the second temple period by a scholar, archeologist, and historian whose research into the subject is unparalleled. I have the print edition and cannot justify the purchase price of the Digital, though I hope to see a great sale on this soon. For anyone seeking to add toward your reference library in regard to the second temple period, this is a no-brainer and highly recommended. I also have his Ancient Synogogue work that has proven very valuable for my studies on community.
    1. I have all of Cassuto's works in print but I am eyeballing the prices on the Logos digital editions. Hands down, Cassuto's contextual understanding of Exodus along with his Ancient Near Eastern scholarship and linguistic comprehension makes this book a must have. Check out his commentaries on Genesis as well.
      1. I have all of Cassuto's works in print but I am eyeballing the prices on the Logos digital editions. Hands down, Cassuto's contextual understanding of Genesis along with his Ancient Near Eastern scholarship and linguistic comprehension makes this book (along with the other) a must have for anyone.
        1. I have all of Cassuto's works in print but I am eyeballing the prices on the Logos digital editions. Hands down, Cassuto's contextual understanding of Genesis along with his Ancient Near Eastern scholarship and linguistic comprehension makes this book (along with the other) a must have for anyone. Check out his commentary on Exodus as well. It is stellar!
          1. Hands down, the majority of this set presents the student of the Word a robust, in-depth commentary that is language intensive and sensitive to context. I would love to see more resources that reflect Jewish scholarship such as Rabbi Jonathan Sacks--among other leading Jewish thought-leaders. I would also recommend--for those interested in this series, to add Umberto Cassuto's commentaries on Genesis (in two parts) to your library. I have the print copies of this set (most of them) but was able to get an incredible deal during March Madness on this entire set. I wouldn't purchase it at the high point of 370, but wait for sales to come along. This set is in my top of tops!
            1. I personally do not understand why Logos does not make it mandatory to add actual comments when leaving a review of a book. I believe it would weed out superficial reviewers and, at best, define why someone does not like a book. In the scope of a "theology of worship," this book is an absolute must for anyone's library. I have the print book and I cannot yet justify purchasing the digital edition at the price it is listed, but the book has spawned a great degree of thought in regard to worship and there are very few books available that attempt to dive into a theology of worship. Kudos to Block for the effort and, if the book dropped here to anything under $30 I believe it is a worthwhile investment for your Logos library, but I don't think close to $40 justifies it.
              1. Succinct study bible in regard to the notes-does not go into great depth, but valuable commentary. The “heresy’ naysayers are what’s wrong with so many in the religious literature arena. It’s a myopic and insecure way to approach theological differences and one that often-rather than burn books-burned men at the behest of zealous acolytes of theological fervor.
                1. His convoluted effort to navigate I Corinthians 11 alone is astounding to me as it lacks the level of scholarship one would assume comes with this commentary. He presents one interpretation for women and hair and completely ignores men and hair, especially since his interpretation would fall short when trying to use the same explanation he uses for the women. Furthermore, he obviously holds a view of inspiration that places quite a bit of what Paul writes as "personal" and not divinely inspired. Example:" Here, regrettably, Paul gets himself into a theological quagmire" Hays, R. B. (1997). First Corinthians (p. 186). Louisville, KY: John Knox Press.
                  1. Daniel deSilva is a tremendous, easy-to-follow instructor. While I don't agree with everything in the course, it is a stellar overview of apocryphal literature.
                    1. Very glad that you enjoyed it. Kind regards, David
                  2. I am going to assume that this commentary will be much the same as reading Calvin's writings on Romans...