• Extremely helpful introduction to Hebrew discourse analysis. I reviewed this book for the Spring 2020 edition of the Interdisciplinary Journal on Biblical Authority. From my conclusion: "Patton and Putnam can help students build on the basic grammar and reading skills they should have attained by helping them analyze a text beyond the sentence level. This discipline will benefit anyone wanting to improve their Hebrew for personal study, academic work, Bible translation, teaching, or preaching. I highly recommend this book as an introduction to Hebrew discourse analysis."
    1. Very helpful overview. For professors, scholars, and even intermediate students wishing to know what key developments have taken place and what the state of discussion is for many major issues in the study of Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic. The author also makes suggestions for further advancement of the field and gives reading suggestions at the end of each chapter, in addition to a large bibliography at the end of the book.
      1. A very helpful, clear, concise introduction to Biblical Hebrew. I used it to finish up my 1st year studies and loved the convenience of the Logos edition.
        1. A very helpful collection of essays with sound advice on issues and methods, especially where textual criticism intersects apologetics.
          1. This is the best stand-alone introduction to the accents I have seen. Futato gives no excuse for neglecting them. He provides a clear, engaging, practical introduction. The Logos edition has several benefits: The complete digital text is very helpful for displaying in an in-person or virtual classroom if teaching with it. Real page numbers in the app and desktop program and instant citations in exported text from the desktop version mean students lose nothing that the print version would provide for citation purposes. Instant hyperlinks open websites in a browser. The book appears in global searches across one's Logos library. Right-clicking a word displays treatments in one's other Logos resources. Instant previews of Sripture examples and internal references in the book from the index are a nice touch. One suggestion: directly link other Logos resources mentioned in the book. Several library resources (such as other books on the accents) could be linked to open if one has them in Logos. Likewise, Futato recommends the Hebrew cantillations (p. 53). It would be great if it opened automatically. I LOVE this book and hope to use it in my teaching as well as personal review as I seek to master the Hebrew accents to better understand and share God's Word.