• This is a must-have, and at a ridiculously low price. If you don't believe me, try picking up a used set, in German! If you can even find one.
    1. Please note that this is the 2007 edition, and that there is a newer edition.
      1. Moreover, the sixth edition may be coming out soon (?), as the fifth edition was published in 2013, which would make this (4th) edition well dated.
    2. Strongs is NOT a research dictionary, nor does it add much at all to the user's knowledge of the biblical vocabulary. Much better to purchade Mounce or even Vine's.
      1. While I much prefer the classic Strong's Exhaustive Concordance of Greek and Herew becaue it's a much more complete work, I wouldn't say this would add nothing to one's knowledge of Biblical vocabulary. There are a variety of very important Greek words and even Hebrew words that other dictionaries use bad translations to fit their agenda. Such as the constant incorrect usage of YHWH from the Tetragrammatron. God's name is Yehovah in the English and I don't have Hebrew fonts that work with Google. However, many dictionaries and commentaries and Interlinears and Lexicons don't get all the jots and tiddles right and you'd think in their scholarly learning they would which is why I said they have an agenda.
    3. Just posted on the parallel books on urban legends of the Old and of the New Testaments, so won't repeat that all here. The category "urban legend" is misused here. An urban legend is a story that is passed from person to person about some supposed event, one which occurred to a person whom the teller does not know, often a FOAF (friend of a friend). It is a story characterized by its rootlessness, and by its longevity - no-one can say when or where it happened. Urban legends usually have an ironic twist, often either frightening or humorous. The instances in this book are not urban legends at all, but "common misconceptions" (this correct noun is used in the subtitle)." And even then, many of these "misconceptions" are based on legitimate differences of opinion; that is, the list is not obviously a list of errors.
      1. This treatment, while of great value, completely misuses the term "urban legend." An urban legend is a story that is passed from person to person about some supposed event, one which occurred to a person whom the teller does not know, often a FOAF (friend of a friend). An urben legend is characterized by its rootlessness (it happened last year in the South! a missionary to Africa said he heard it!), and by its longevity. Urban legends usually have an ironic twist, often either frightening or humorous. "Did you hear about the woman who put her cat in the microwave to dry it off?" is an urban legend. (We cannot determine: When and where did this happen? What woman? Is there a link to a newspaper account?) "Did you hear about the missionary's kid in Africa who played rock music, and the 'natives' told them, 'This is the exact music we play to summon demons!'?" Christian urban legend. The unbelieving professor who drops a piece of chalk to see if God can make it not shatter? Christian urban legend. The hitchhiker that says Jesus is about to return, and then disappears from the car - Christian urban legend that has circulated for many decades. The instances in this book are not urban legends at all, but "common exegetical misperceptions" (this correct noun is used in the subtitle) which are passed along from person to person." That the Mosaic food laws were about healthy living; that the tithe was 10% of one's income. Misinterpretations. Chapter 17, a section about how NASA supposedly proved Joshua's long day, is closer to this genre, but it's more myth than urban legend, since it gives names and dates. Given that it is the title of the book, some fact-checker should have caught this error! The companion New Testament volume is based on the same misdefinition.
        1. I think you're taking the literalism too far. It's obvious that they intended it to be tongue-in-cheek.
      2. This treatment, while of great value, completely misuses the term "urban legend." An urban legend is a story that is passed from person to person about some supposed event, one which occurred to a person whom the teller does not know, often a FOAF (friend of a friend). An urben legend is characterized by its rootlessness (it happened last year in the South! a missionary to Africa said he heard it!), and by its longevity. Urban legends usually have an ironic twist, often either frightening or humorous. "Did you hear about the woman who put her cat in the microwave to dry it off?" is an urban legend. (We cannot determine: When and where did this happen? What woman? Is there a link to a newspaper account?) "Did you hear about the missionary's kid in Africa who played rock music, and the 'natives' told them, 'This is the exact music we play to summon demons!'?" Christian urban legend. The unbelieving professor who drops a piece of chalk to see if God can make it not shatter? Christian urban legend. The instances in this book are not urban legends at all, but "common exegetical misperceptions" (this correct noun is used in the subtitle) which are passed along from person to person." That "agape is superior to phile" or the wise men were really three kings are nowhere close to urban legends. Given that it is the title of the book, some fact-checker should have caught this error! I haven't read the companion Old Testament volume, the table of contents reveals the same error.
        1. Noten que esta es la tercera, NO la cuarta edición.
          1. En realidad es la segunda edición. Eso dice en la primera página de la biblia
        2. I like this book, but feel I should give a caveat to the buyer - it is terribly out of date. Much has changed since 1960, including Martin Hengel's work on Judaism and Hellenism. The very first page of the sample (p. 13) is revealing. Perhaps someone can recommend a more up-to-date survey.
          1. Great to finally have NETS on Logos! My only concern is the warning that "This product is temporarily unavailable on mobile and the web app", which I didn's see before purchasing it.
            1. Please accept our apologies for the inconvenience. NETS will only become available on Mobile and the Web App after a future update.
            2. NETS is now available for mobile, thanks
          2. I thought that in an earlier version, there was Word List of the Greenspahn vocabulary to download in order to form cards. Is this still available?