• I cannot pass up a Hebrew Lexicon or Dictionary and I use these so much that I have created a workplace with over a dozen such references. I have many favorites, but I wish to speak most particularly of the Dictionary of Classical Hebrew, and particularly of Volume IX, the index. This saves me much time. If I am looking for a word in Hebrew but wish to find it quickly from a list of English words, the DCH is my best tool. For instance, if I am looking for the word wound, it offers me nouns, verbs and a series of other possibilities. In this example I needed the noun, and it immediately offers me a choice of eight choices, where I can quickly pick the one I was looking for. When I click on it, all my other dictionaries immediately turn to that word. If, on the other hand, I type the word in Hebrew, that is much more time consuming, as it may offer me ten choices and it is not clear which one is the one I am searching for. So, not only is the DCH a wonderful Lexicon, it also gives me access to all the rest in the fastest possible way. I am extremely pleased with this purchase.
    1. I would purchase an answer key if it was available.
      1. Mark L. Strauss delivers a brilliant seminar on the topic of choosing a Bible translation, or understanding the differences between translations, especially the topic of formal equivalence (more literal translations) vs. functional equivalence (translating the thought or idea so it will be understood). I had recently written in an article that it is impossible to translate a text without interpreting that text, something that Mark does an excellent job in pointing out. This topic of Bible translations is a favorite one for me, and I find myself attracted to seminars and articles on this subject. I would suggest that Dr. Strauss may well have produced the best explanation of any I have studied over the years. Even though I come to a different conclusion than Dr. Strauss (I prefer formal equivalent translations), I also use dozens of translations as I read and study, and like to use translations in other languages at times. The more difficult the verse, the greater the number of total translations I use. Even though I have a different bottom-line take home lesson, Dr. Strauss explains why I prefer the formal equivalence. This is a seminar I will have to listen to again multiple times to truly squeeze out the many wonderful points that Mark makes. Just for those who may be curious, I love the idea of learning the figures of speech and expressions used in olden times. I also prefer to leave ambiguous passages ambiguous rather than choosing the wrong interpretation. There is much more I would like to say, but I will just finish by saying that I would like to purchase a Bible version that is even more literal than the NASB, and is something in between the NASB and an interlinear. And I will continue to use my forty plus versions. Great job!
        1. Mark L. Strauss delivers a brilliant seminar on the topic of choosing a Bible translation, or understanding the differences between translations, especially the topic of formal equivalence (more literal translations) vs. functional equivalence (translating the thought or idea so it will be understood). I had recently written in an article that it is impossible to translate a text without interpreting that text, something that Mark does an excellent job in pointing out. This topic of Bible translations is a favorite one for me, and I find myself attracted to seminars and articles on this subject. I would suggest that Dr. Strauss may well have produced the best explanation of any I have studied over the years. Even though I come to a different conclusion than Dr. Strauss (I prefer formal equivalent translations), I also use dozens of translations as I read and study, and like to use translations in other languages at times. The more difficult the verse, the greater the number of total translations I use. Even though I have a different bottom-line take home lesson, Dr. Strauss explains why I prefer the formal equivalence. This is a seminar I will have to listen to again multiple times to truly squeeze out the many wonderful points that Mark makes. Just for those who may be curious, I love the idea of learning the figures of speech and expressions used in olden times. I also prefer to leave ambiguous passages ambiguous rather than choosing the wrong interpretation. There is much more I would like to say, but I will just finish by saying that I would like to purchase a Bible version that is even more literal than the NASB, and is something in between the NASB and an interlinear. And I will continue to use my forty plus versions. Great job!
          1. I feel an immense amount of gratitude for this extensive collection. It would have been worth it just for Leeser, Geneva, Tyndale and Spurrell alone. I have hard copies of some of these Bibles that I had to leave behind upon my return to Chile. The Geneva Bible hard copy is huge. I look forward to studying the versions I am not familiar with, also. Thank-you Logos.