• What is the difference between this edition and the 4th edition (1891), which is already available (and part of the 24-volume English Bible Collection? If Leeser died in 1868, then an edition of his work published in 1891 may very well just be a reprint of his earlier edition...?
    1. Hi John. They seem to be identical. I have a copy of the 1853 in PDF format (available at no cost from Internet Archive so you can also check it out) and compared it to the 1891 version I just purchased from Logos. They have the same designs, dates (including the 1853 date as being the only date in the text itself, i.e., preface), and notes. I am quite a Leeser fan, and so about a year or so ago I also purchased an undated hard copy of the Leeser Bible. The nice thing about the hard copy is that it contains the Hebrew on one side of the page and the English on the other, but my hard copy has none of the footnotes that the Logos 1891 publication has (which seems identical to the 1853 publication). It is easy to miss these valuable footnotes if one is not careful, however.
  • The "About" bio on this page appears to be for Robert Jenson, not Eric Gritsch.
    1. Nice to see the marketing info for this resource finally clarified. This is the lightly-annotated Reader's Edition of the NJB - really little more than the NJB text itself, presented in paragraphs (the Psalms are formatted as poetry, but that seems to be about it). If all you're looking for is a comparison text using this interesting and understandable dynamic translation, this is the resource you want - and you can't beat the price! However, if you're fond enough of the NJB version to use it as a primary translation, you'll probably want the other New Jerusalem Bible resource referenced above (still in development as I write this), which will be a Logos edition of the Standard edition of the NJB, including the terrific extensive notes and xrefs - and hopefully incorporating some of the page layout formatting that helps make that Bible such a pleasure to use in print editions.
      1. What is this resource, exactly? Is it Wesley's version of the New Testament, along with his Notes on the NT and his Notes on the OT? If so, what is the display relationship between the translation and the notes? Does the translation appear as Bible or as a BIble Commentary?
        1. $19.99 on PrePub for these 3 slim "upgrade" volumes? Really? That's almost half the price of the original resource, containing the entire NT, Gen, Exo, and the RSV2CE text. There are still 39 OT books to go. At this rate, this Study Bible might end up costing well over $200. This is a good series, but it would be nice if there was a way to "top off" the set as the volumes are released at a price point that reflected series-level pricing.I'd be OK with a PrePub price for the OT as a set, which got released as volumes were readied, the way base packages often include licenses for works-in-progress.
          1. Very Good Point
          2. Great point, John. What's more, the first NT volume came out in 2000, so it's going to take close to 20 years to produce this thing! It's certainly a good resource, but that's a long time.
          3. The pricing reflects the price-point of the stand-alone volumes. They retail for $11.95 each. $11.95 times 3 volumes is $35.85. So the Logos price is a savings from the retail price. The NT volumes were similarly priced at around $10 when they were first released (but are now $11.95 each). It was years of having the NT released piecemeal before the whole NT was released together for a considerably lower price than the individual volumes together. You can blame Ignatius Press for the strategy, but it's not that unusual. It's a big project. So either they can wait until the entire Old Testament is ready (financing it out of their own pocket throughout the years of development) and release the final product at probably a much higher price. Or they can release them as they are available, giving quality content to those who don't want to wait while financing the project through to completion. And at the end, they'll be able to bundle it and sell it at a much lower price. So people can wait for the whole Old Testament to be released in order to save money. That's certainly a respectable choice. But you'll be waiting several more years before it's all published. Or else you can be an early adopter and buy them in pieces now, knowing you'll probably be spending $20-$30 a year for the next 5+ years.
        2. This product page is a great example of how frustrating it can be at times to try to research Faithlife products for purchase - lots of marketing fluff, but very little useful information for making an informed decision - in this case, such as how it relates to other published or in-process publications of the same or similar material, even those being published by Faithlife! I can't understand the lack of concern for providing substantive descriptions of products, especially products priced at hundreds of dollars.
          1. "The commandment “Thou shalt not murder” is not appropriate to therapeutic abortion, the intention of which is towards the health of the woman, not against the fetus. " Well, OK then. Thank you for providing this gem in the product preview. Money saved.
            1. Wow! This is deeply disturbing. Thanks for point this out.
          2. I was directed to this page via an in-program tease to check for recent additions to this collection, but it is highly cumbersome to try to figure out which volumes I lack, as this page does not indicate either what I do/don't own, or the change history of the collection. My library says I have 56 of these; this collection consists of 55, yet there are several I recognize as new. These tend to be pretty good Critical commentaries, but I'm not interested in doing in-depth analysis to see what I'd be getting for my money.
            1. Hi Neil Elliot, I just thought I might be of some help and earn a prayer from you on my behalf. Anyway all the N.T. books are there as I am sure you already know, and from the O.T. the only books which are missing are the following. Please check your collection against my list and see what you have and what is still missing.. Here goes: Missing are; 1 and 2 chronicles, Isaiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, and last but not least, Joel.. I pray this brings a level of comfort to your soul. In God's Holy Name, Rev. Jaime..
            2. To: John W.. Gillis, I just thought I might be of some help and earn a prayer from you on my behalf. Anyway all the N.T. books are there as I am sure you already know, and from the O.T. the only books which are missing are the following. Please check your collection against my list and see what you have and what is still missing.. Here goes: Missing are; 1 and 2 chronicles, Isaiah, Ezekiel, Hosea, and last but not least, Joel.. I pray this brings a level of comfort to your soul. In God's Holy Name, Rev. Jaime..
            3. I did the work to determine what the Apr 2014 update consists of. The previous version appeared as 56 vols in my library (vs. 55 vols listed here as of Apr 2014). But 5 of the UBS vols, each covering multi NT books, showed up as multi resources, for each Biblical book (e.g. the vol on Col & Phm appears as 2 resources, the vol on Thessalonians as 2, the vol on Timothy & Titus as 3, the vol on John's letters as 3, and the vol on Jude & 2Pet as 2). The April 2014 update adds 6 vols: 2 vols on 1&2 Kings; a vol on Ezra & Nehemiah; a vol on Sirach; a vol on Wisdom [of Solomon]; and a vol on "the Shorter Books of the Deuterocanon". The UBS website indicates that 3 more vols have been completed which are not yet available for Logos (2 vols on Isaiah published in 2011, and a vol on 1&2 Maccabees published in 2012). Books not yet in the UBS English "Handbook" series include Num, Jgs, 1&2Chr, Ezek, Hos, and Joel. The UBS site indicates this catalog info is updated as of Jan 2013.
          3. I thought this idea looked useful, but upon examination, there does not appear to be any value for the customer. It's simply a means of paying some or all of your book budget before you get your books, with no benefit for either pre-paying or committing the dollars. Subscriptions or retainers generally involve a trade-off of better pricing. If this plan offered a built-in discount of, say, 15% (so a $60 monthly credit could be purchased @ $51), there would be benefits to all parties.