• Let’s go further together. Read the New Testament with us.

    There’s an African proverb that says, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”


    Join us on the 5x5x5 reading plan as we go through the New Testament together in a year. It only takes five minutes a day five days a week to read along, and each week we’ll post five prompts to help you dig deeper into the text.


    To join the reading plan, click this link when you’re logged in. Or join the reading plan manually:


    • Click the plus sign next to the Home Page dashboard in the app (on desktop, web, or mobile)
    • Choose Reading Plan from the list
    • Select the 5x5x5 Bible Reading Plan


    You can check your progress from your Logos dashboard anytime, and mark each day’s reading complete when you finish.


    That’s it!


    Let’s get started.


    -The Logos Team

  • I'm not sure where to ask this, but I love the fact that the scroll feature can be turned off on the Logos App (Android and iOS) for bibles so we can swipe to change the page, but can this feature also be used for the sermon section of the app too please? I would love to use Logos for sermons, but I don't like scrolling - I lose my place too easily - I need to be able to swipe to change page.
    1. published a newsletter

      ReadLearn How to Incorporate Commentaries into Word Studies

      FREE Webinar by Morris Proctor: How to Incorporate Commentaries into Word Study - November 26th at 2pm (CDT)


      During this 60-minute webinar, Logos authorized trainer Morris Proctor will show you various ways to incorporate specific commentaries into your word study. The methods will include Biblical Sense, the Guide section, Lemma in Passage, as well as the power-user feature, Parallel Resource Set.


      As a participant, you’ll receive a special webinar-only discount to upgrade your Logos collection to Platinum.


      Can’t make the November 26th time slot? No worries. When you register, you'll be emailed details to access the archived event once it's posted.


      Register now


      1. Thank you God for this amazing tool!
        1. I tried to log in to the 'basic' Logos 8 program but was unsucessful after changing my password. How can I log in to try it out. I'm also at work (I work for a missionary/businessman/friend/sponsor in South Korea. He has 83 videos on You Tube, has written at least 200 sermons and about 370 devotionals (messages). I'm not that much of a writer - I mostly just research and copy and paste for my homework at a free seminary at Dongsan (Presbyterian) church in Ansan, South Korea. However I still enjoy going to the free seminary, but de boss isn't so keen on this as I'm always tired on Mondays (He's working on his ESL PhD and is teaching a PhD candidate course at Westminster Seminary in Seoul - Please don't tell him I'm on this website as he is pretty 'controlling' and probably would 'kick me' out of Korea. GBU
          1. Have you "purchased" (for free) the Logos 8 basic package and downloaded it to your computer? Where did you change your password? If so, are you using a Windows or Mac-based computer?
        2. published a newsletter

          ReadPart 2 – Learn How to Do a Hebrew/Greek Word Study

          FREE Webinar by Morris Proctor: Hebrew/Greek Word Study for the English Student: Part 2 - October 29th at 2pm (CDT)


          Join authorized trainer Morris Proctor for this 1-hour webinar as he practically demonstrates word study from James 5:13-20. By participating in this webinar you’ll also qualify for a 60% discount on select Mobile Ed courses.


          So please join authorized trainer Morris Proctor for a FREE webinar October 29th at 2 pm (CDT) as he discusses several ways to effectively study. 


          Can’t make the October 29th time slot? No worries. When you register, you'll be emailed details to access the archived event once it's posted. If you have already registered, we look forward to seeing you.


          Register now


          Missed part 1? No problem, you can watch it here.

          1. New Testament Reading Plan Week 38: John 1–5

            1. “In the Gospel of John, Jesus is cast as the Word (the logos in Greek). John’s use of the concept of the Word conveys the ideas that Jesus is preexistent (John 1:1–2) and divine—one with God the Father, yet a distinct person. . . . Both the Jewish and the Greek associations of ‘the Word’ find their ultimate meaning in creation. . . . [John] took a familiar concept, rich with meaning, and gave it a surprising twist. . . . ‘The Word’ was God, not an impersonal force, not just a tool God used to accomplish his purpose. ‘The Word’ was personal . . . God came in human form as Jesus (John 1:14).” Read John 1 and Genesis 1, then spend time contemplating this truth: that Jesus is “God’s creative, life-giving, light-giving Word, the logos who has come to Earth in the flesh, the power of God that created the world and the reason of God that sustains the world.”
            2. Beginning in Chapter 2, John presents a series of signs (or miracles) designed to prove Jesus’ identity as the Messiah and Son of God. Compare John 2:1–12 with John 20:30–31. Why do you think John chose to document the miracle in Cana first, when there were so many others to choose from? (There are six others miracles in John alone.) How does the Cana miracle affirm who Jesus is? 
            3. In John 3:3–10, what does Nicodemus not understand? Is it possible to see the kingdom of God without being born again (vv. 5–8)? What parallel does Jesus make when he talks about “being lifted up” in verse 14? (See John 8:28, 12:32–34, and Num 21:4–9 for insight.) Spend time thinking about Nicodemus’ story. Who in your life is like Nicodemus—wrongly trusting in other things than Jesus for salvation? Spend time praying for them.
            4. Jesus talks with a Samaritan woman in John 4. What did Jesus say would be the result of drinking the water he offered (4:13–14)? How is the world’s need for salvation and eternal life like thirst? How is Jesus’ gift of salvation different from what the world offers? 
            5. In John 5 1–15, Jesus heals a blind man on the Sabbath, breaking the Jewish law (5:9; cf. Lev 23:3). Why do some people prioritize keeping religious rules over fostering a relationship with Jesus? Read Matthew 5:17–18, and consider why rule-keeping is futile. Then, spend time thinking about relationships and why they are more important than rules and regulations.


            1. Can anyone tell me where to find this? logos bookstore does not carry this.
            2. Do you mean the reading plan? I don’t think it is in book form. Logos just shares this like this. Since you’re subscribed to this page, it should show up on your Home screen in Logos under reading plans. You might also check the Logos blog. But I don’t think they’ve published these as a downloadable resource otherwise.
            3. Thank you!
          2. New Testament Reading Plan Week 37: 1 John 3–3 John

            1. First John 3:1 contains one of the clearest affirmations of who we are in relation to God. Take a few minutes to reflect on the dramatic emphasis the apostle John conveys here. You can even go word by word or phrase by phrase to let these words sink in. How remarkable it is that God shows us such great love! How shocking and gracious it is that the God of the universe calls us his children!
            2. One phrase in 1 John 4:8 is often taken from its context: “God is love.” As C. S. Lewis says in Mere Christianity, “All sorts of people are fond of repeating the Christian statement that ‘God is love’. . . . Of course, what these people mean when they say that God is love is often something quite different: they really mean ‘Love is God’. They really mean that our feelings of love, however and wherever they arise, and whatever results they produce, are to be treated with great respect. Perhaps they are: but that is something quite different from what Christians mean by the statement ‘God is love’.” Reflect for a moment on the differences between those two phrases (“God is love” and “love is God”). How does 1 John 4 help you see God’s love more clearly? How might this understanding of God's love change shift how you love others?
            3. Our culture often thinks of love as a feeling: you’re either in love or you’re not—and if you’re not in love, there’s simply nothing to be done about it. Yet 1 John is clear on this point: love isn’t only a feeling, though our affections play an important role. Consider how John ties our faith and our love together in chapter 5:3–4. As you read through the rest of the chapter, remember how love is the motivation: it’s why God rescued us from sin, and now it’s why we obey his commands.
            4. Does 2 John seem like the Cliff’s Notes version of 1 John? To be certain, the apostle affirms some of the same themes from 1 John. Yet it’s still God’s living and active Word for us. Consider the specific encouragements and warnings in 2 John. What does John applaud in his readers? What does John warn against? Which sticks out to you today?
            5. Third John calls us to think about how we love and protect God’s people. How does John urge the Church to care for one another (vv. 5–8)? How does John model correction for false teachers (vv. 9–12)?


            1. published a newsletter

              ReadLearn How to Do a Hebrew/Greek Word Study

              FREE Webinar by Morris Proctor: Hebrew/Greek Word Study for the English Student - October 15th at 2pm (CDT)


              Join authorized trainer Morris Proctor for this 1-hour webinar as he shows you several ways to setup Logos for effective word study even though you may not be a language scholar. By participating in this webinar you’ll also qualify for a special discount on select Mobile Ed courses.


              So please join authorized trainer Morris Proctor for a FREE webinar October 15th at 2 pm (CDT) as he discusses several ways to effectively study. 


              Can’t make the October 15th time slot? No worries. When you register, you'll be emailed details to access the archived event once it's posted. If you have already registered, we look forward to seeing you.


              Register now



              1. Do we know if Logos 8 software was updated to be supported by the new iMac software version Catalina?I'd rather not update my iMac until I know for sure there will be no big bug issues with Apple's new version.
                1. Thank you!
                2. Come on in - the Catalina water is fine. I've been running both Catalina Beta and Logos Beta - and as far as I can tell, everything works well. The only thing that I really would like to see is "Dark Mode" for Logos.
                3. Greg, that's a known issue. ;)
              2. New Testament Reading Plan Week 36: Titus 1–1 John 2

                1. After identifying himself as an apostle and servant of God, Paul addresses why he left Titus in Crete: to appoint elders in every city who live lives totally different than the Cretan culture. To assist Titus in this task, Paul provides qualifications for leaders (elders) in the church. What are the positive and negative qualifications (vv. 6–9)? Do you think these guidelines are important for today’s Church?
                2. Next, Paul discusses proper Christian conduct in Titus 2. What did he expect of older men and women (vv. 2–4)? What did he expect of younger men and women (vv. 4–6)? What did he expect of servants (vv. 9–10)? Why are believers to behave this way (vv. 8, 10–11)? Reflect on your own life. Where do you fall short in these areas?
                3. In the final chapter of Titus, Paul instructs Titus to remind believers of their duties toward those in authority—and humankind in general. How are believers to act (Titus 3:1–2), and what should motivate them (vv. 3–7)? 
                4. First John 1:1–5 and John 1:1–2 reveal a lot about Jesus. How do these two passages help you better understand the Father and the Sont? How does seeing God in this way teach us to see ourselves more clearly? (See vv. 6–9.) What’s the promise in these verses that encourages us?
                5. First John refers to Jesus as both our “advocate” (v. 2:1) and “the propitiation (atonement, or “covering”) for our sins (cf. Rom 3:25; Heb 9:5). John Piper writes, “[Jesus] stands before his Father in heaven, and every time we sin, he doesn't make a new propitiation. He doesn’t die again and again. Instead he opens his portfolio and lays the exhibits of Good Friday on the bench before the Judge. Photographs of the crown of thorns, the lashing, the mocking soldiers, the agonies of the cross, and the final cry of victory: It is finished.” Contemplate the significance of Jesus as your advocate in heaven who has once-for-all declared your sin forgiven.